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Public Finance Seminar - Inequality and Migration (MW23.4)

Content of the Seminar

The seminar will feature topics from two broad areas of research in public finance: inequality and migration.

Inequality is receiving more and more attention from academics and politicians alike. In your seminar papers, you will explore the academic literature on the determinants and consequences of inequality, for example the link between inequality and growth.

In the last couple of years, the number of refugees arriving in Europe has increased enormously. However, a lot of the literature on international migration focuses on "regular" economic migration. In this seminar, we will explore other forms of migration such as refugee seeking and illegal immigration.


Plan

June 2016
Central registration
4 Jul 2016 For those students allocated to this seminar: Meeting and presentation of topics (4.00pm in SR 121, CZ3, slides)
11 Jul 2016
Choice of preferred topics and a preferred start date (see next item). The preferences serve as the basis for the allocation of topics.
8 Aug 2016
to
19 Sep 2016
Start of your individual writing period.

You can choose to receive your topic on any date between August 8 and September 19. After receiving your topic, you have 5 weeks to complete a first version of your seminar paper. The paper will then be refereed by another student within 1 week. After receiving the referee report you have 2 more weeks to improve your paper on the basis of the referee's comments.
3 Oct 2016
to
14 Nov 2016
Submission of the final version of your seminar paper (by email to your supervisor).
18 Nov 2016
Publication of schedule for seminar sessions (incl. allocation of discussants)
Dec 2016
Seminar sessions (three full days)

Requirements

You will have to read and understand original research papers as a part of this course. Many of these papers employ econometric techniques and a basic understanding of econometrics, especially of regression analysis, is necessary. If you have not taken any econometrics courses before, we recommend taking "Empirical Methods" (MW 24.1) first.


Guidelines

Guidelines for Seminar Papers and Final Papers

Questions for Referee Reports

Guidelines for Seminar Presentations and Discussions


Schedule for Seminar Sessions

Tuesday, 29 November 2016, Room 309 (Carl-Zeiß-Str. 3)

Time
Presenter
Topic
Discussant
Slides Presentation
8.30
Alica Percontra
MD1: Migration Decision: Theoretical Basics
Omar Martin Ahmad
Slides
9.20
Michael Khoury 
MD2: Migration Decision: Empirical Results
Rita Maghularia 
Slides
10.10
BREAK
10.30
Viktoriya Dyachenko     
MD3: Migration Decision: The Role of Risk Aversion
Barrett Joseph Miller
Slides
11.20
Lamin Fatty
MD4: Repeat Migration
Slides
12.10
LUNCH BREAK
13.10
Sara Lajthia
MD5: Migration: Migration and Return Migration of the Very-high Skilled
Liliya Rakach
Slides
14.00
Dorina Kacorri
MR5: Refugee Policies: Coordination and Externalities 
Ann-Marie Sommerfeld 
Slides
14.50
BREAK
15.00
Matilda Hodaj
MI3: Effect if Naturalized Migrants of Redistribution
Heba Ismaeil
Slides 
15.50

General Discussion 
   

Friday, 2 December 2016, Room 128 (Carl-Zeiß-Str. 3)

Time
Presenter
Topic
Discussant
Slides Presentation
8.30
Roshanak Khosravikia
MC1: Wages and Employment at the Destination
Alice Percontra
Slides
9.20
Vologymyr Bondarenko
MC2: Entrepreneurship and Self-Employment of Immigrants                   
Michael Khoury
Slides
10.10
BREAK
10.30
Lihour Tang
MC4: Brain Drain and Brain Gain
Viktoriya Dyachenko    
Slides
11.20
Qi Sun
IB1: Wage Inequality in the US and How to Measure It
Shuijing Chen
Lamin Fatty
Slides
12.10
LUNCH BREAK
13.10
Kateryna Latysh
IB2: Do skill differences create inequality? 
Sara Lajthia
Slides
14.00
Omar Martin Ahmad
IB3: Inequality and Intergenerational Mobility
Dorina Kacorri
Slides
14.50
 
General Discussion
   

Friday, 9 December 2016, Room 308 (Carl-Zeiß-Str. 3)

Time
Presenter
Topic
Discussant
Slides Presentation
8.30
Rita Maghularia
IG1: Inequality and Growth: Cross-country Studies                                 
Matilda Hodaj
Slides
9.20
Barrett Joseph Miller    
IE1: Does Inequality Cause Large-scale Violence?
Roshanak Khosravikia
Slides
10.10
BREAK
10.30
Shuijing Chen
IE2: Inequality and Migrant Selection
Volodymyr Bondarenko
Slides
11.20
Liliya Rakach
IE3: Inequality and Health
Lihour Tang
Slides
12.10
LUNCH BREAK
13.10
Heba Ismaeil
IP3: Gender Differences and Woman Suffrage
Kateryna Latysh
Slides
14.00
Ann-Marie Sommerfeld
IP1: Attitudes to Income Inequality 
Qi Sun
Slides 
14.50
  General Discussion
   



Topics

Part 1: Migration

MD Migration Decision
MD1 Modeling the Migration Decision (T)
MD2 Empirical Results on Migration Decisions (E)
MD3 The Role Of Risk Aversion (E)
MD4 Repeat Migration (E, T)
MD5 Migration and Return Migration of the Very-high Skilled (E)
MC Effects on Countries of Origin and Destination
MC1 Wages and Employment at the Destination (E, T)
MC2 Entrepreneurship and Self-Employment of Immigrants (E)
MC3 Public Finances at the Destination (E)
MC4 Brain Drain and Brain Gain (E, T)
MA Attitudes Towards Migration
MA1 Evidence from Survey Data (E)
MA2 Evidence from Voting Behaviour (E)
MR Refugees
MR1 Differences: Refugees vs economically motivated migrants? (E)
MR2 Determinants of Refuge Seeking (E)
MR3 Advantages and Disadvantages of Ethnic Enclaves (E)
MR4 Integration of Forced Migrants (T, E)
MR5 Refugee Policies: Coordination and Externalities (T)
MI Illegal Immigration, Legalization and Naturalization
MI1 Who Migrates Illegally? (E, T)
MI2 Effects of Legalization and Naturalization (E)
MI3 Effect of Naturalized Migrants on Redistribution (T)

Part 2: Inequality

IB Basics
IB1 Wage Inequality in the US and How to Measure It (E, T)
IB2 Do skill differences create inequality? (T)
IB3 Inequality and Intergenerational Mobility (E, T)
IG Inequality and Growth
IG1 Cross-country Studies (E)
IG2 The Land-Ownership Instrument (E)
IG3 Opportunity vs Effort (E)
IG4 Inequality, Initial Poverty and Growth (E)
IE Other Effects of Inequality
IE1 Does Inequality Cause Large-scale Violence? (E)
IE2 Inequality and Migrant Selection (T, E)
IE3 Inequality and Health (E)
IP Preferences for Redistribution
IP1 Attitudes to Income Inequality (E)
IP2 Redistribution and Linguistic Fractionalization (E)
IP3 Gender Differences and Women Suffrage (E)